jaketechstasy:

What do you REALLY know about this symbol? Although in modern times it has come to represent sacrilege, or in some groups even associated with the devil, this is not it’s origin. This is the cross of St. Peter. He was an apostle of Christ who preached the gospel after the crucifixion. During Christianity’s mass persecution under the blade of ancient Rome, Peter was martyred and crucified. However, he made a special plea - to be crucified upside-down, as he believed he was not worthy to die in the same manner that Christ did. Hence, this symbol, the inverted cross, is ultimately a symbol of man’s imperfection, or rather our ‘humanity’ in general. Food for thought.In Kabbalah, the cross has four points instead of three (which are normally ‘the father the son and holy spirit). Whereas in Kabbalah the four are ‘Ateh, Malkuth, VeGeburah, VeGedulah’ and culminates with ‘Le-Olahm’ which is usually bringing the two hands together. In English, it translates to “Unto thee, the Kingdom, the power, and the glory, to the ages amen”. This is used in ritual in the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.-Jake Hamilton 

jaketechstasy:

What do you REALLY know about this symbol? Although in modern times it has come to represent sacrilege, or in some groups even associated with the devil, this is not it’s origin. This is the cross of St. Peter. He was an apostle of Christ who preached the gospel after the crucifixion. During Christianity’s mass persecution under the blade of ancient Rome, Peter was martyred and crucified. However, he made a special plea - to be crucified upside-down, as he believed he was not worthy to die in the same manner that Christ did. Hence, this symbol, the inverted cross, is ultimately a symbol of man’s imperfection, or rather our ‘humanity’ in general. Food for thought.

In Kabbalah, the cross has four points instead of three (which are normally ‘the father the son and holy spirit). Whereas in Kabbalah the four are ‘Ateh, Malkuth, VeGeburah, VeGedulah’ and culminates with ‘Le-Olahm’ which is usually bringing the two hands together. In English, it translates to “Unto thee, the Kingdom, the power, and the glory, to the ages amen”. This is used in ritual in the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.


-Jake Hamilton